Pleurisy Root Cut

Pleurisy root was considered by the North American Indians to be one of the "Great White Father's best gifts to the children of nature" because of its specific action for the lungs. And for all chest complaints, it is most valuable in assisting expectoration, subduing inflammation rapidly, reabsorbing exudation from the tissues and serious cavities, and exerting a general and mild tonic effect upon the whole system. A milkweed, without milky juice. The fleshy white root produces several stout, round hairy stems, 3 feet tall. The leaves are lance shaped with the stem clasping toward the flowers. Many small, bright orange flowers with backward flaring petals and hooded crown occur in dense terminal, flat-topped umbels. The pods are 3-4- inches long, furry and upright. Common in the Midwest along dry roadsides. It is a carminative, diaphoretic, diuretic & expectorant.

UPC: 084783015154.

Origin(s): United States.

Latin Name(s): Asclepias tuberosa.

Also known as: Butterfly Weed, wind root, Canada root, silkweed, orange swallow wort, tuber root.

Plant Part(s) Used: Root.

Appearance: Beige.

Aroma: Faint.

Taste: Nutty, bitter.

GMO Status: Non-GMO.

Allergen: None.

Additives: Free of any additives or preservatives.

Applications / Preparations: Can be put into capsules, teas or infused as an herbal extract.

Storage: Store in a sealed container in a cool, dry place.

Shelf Life: It is very difficult to pin down an exact expiration date for most single herbs as they do not really expire, they lose potency or strength over time but will still have value. Unlike synthetic material or drugs, herbs can contain many constituents that contribute to their medicinal effects. Even if when we know what the active constituents are, there are often many of them in a single herb, each with different rates of degradation. Some herbs lose their effect more easily. Other herbs that possess more stable compounds such as alkaloids or steroids will last much longer.

A huge part of the degradation rate of herbs depends also on the storage conditions of the herb, & even on the quality of the herb before storage – how it was grown, harvested, dried & processed. If the product is left in hot places or open to sunlight then it will degrade much quicker than if it was stored in cool, dry place & sealed tightly.

A good rule of thumb is that herbs should be stored no longer than 2-3 years but many herbs will have great strength much longer than that. To determine if a an herb is still good you can check the appearance & aroma. Herbs that are no longer acceptable will have lost much of its vibrant color & will instead appear dull & faded. The bigger key though is to smell the raw materials to see if the potent aroma is still present. 

Warning: Not for use in pregnancy except under the supervision of a qualified healthcare practitioner.



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